Siberia in the seventeenth century

a study of the colonial administration by George V. Lantzeff

Publisher: University of California Press in Berkeley

Written in English
Published: Pages: 235 Downloads: 398
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Places:

  • Siberia (Russia),
  • Soviet Union

Subjects:

  • Siberia (Russia) -- Politics and government,
  • Soviet Union -- Colonies -- Administration

Edition Notes

Statementby George V. Lantzeff.
SeriesUniversity of California publications in history,, vol. 30, 1943
Classifications
LC ClassificationsE173 .C15 vol. 30
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 235 p.
Number of Pages235
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL185559M
LC Control Numbera 43003513
OCLC/WorldCa3152971

seventeenth century. Is he right? Before reading the book, what did you know about the first Thanksgiving? How has this chapter confirmed or refuted what you previously knew? (pp. 85–88) 4. Red Eyes Loewen writes that textbooks speak of . This detailed study examines the social, religious, and institutional conflicts accompanying the Russian Schism of the seventeenth century. By analyzing who opposed the reforms of Patriarch Nikon () and under what circumstances, the author presents a complex and multi-faceted world of popular religious resistance that has been hidden from view for centuries. The Old Believers or “semeiskie” as they are called in Siberia make up a unique regional ethnographic group. They were founded more than years ago by a group of religious dissenters unwilling to accept the liturgical reforms of the . In The Merchants of Siberia, Erika Monahan reconsiders commerce in early modern Russia by reconstructing the trading world of Siberia and the careers of merchants who traded there. She follows the histories of three merchant families from various social ranks who conducted trade in Siberia for well over a : Erika Monahan.

  The title of “The House of the Dead” — Daniel Beer’s history of the vast penal system Russia created in Siberia in the 19th century — comes from the novel Fyodor Dostoyevsky wrote about. This is the first ethnohistory of Siberia to appear in English, tracing the history of the native peoples from the Russian conquest onwards. James Forsyth compares the Siberian experience with that of the Indians and Eskimos in North America and the book as a whole will provide readers with a vast corpus of ethnographic information previously inaccessible to Western .   This is the account of Thubron's 15,mile journey through an astonishing country - one twelfth of the land surface of the whole earth. He journeyed by train, river and truck among the people most damaged by the breakup of the Soviet Union, traveling among Buddhists and animists, radical Christian sects, reactionary Communists and the remnants of a so-call /5(63). Indonesia. Indonesia is a semi-annual journal devoted to the timely study of Indonesia’s culture, history, government, economy, and society. It features original scholarly articles, interviews, translations, and book reviews.

The Russian conquest of Siberia took place in the 16th and 17th centuries, when the Khanate of Sibir had become a loose political structure of vassalages that were being undermined by the activities of Russian explorers. Although outnumbered, the Russians pressured the various family-based tribes into changing their loyalties and establishing distant forts from which they Location: Western Siberia.   "It is a hallucinatory moment: Dostoyevsky, first condemned to death, then sent as a soldier to the endless emptiness of Siberia, where he reads Hegel’s thoughts about the abstract building of History, a building in which neither Siberia nor Africa can have a place, an unsentimental construction made of glass, with its holy ending the Weltgeist, in which all the . The Policies and Attitudes towards the Native Northerners, Seventeenth Century" (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Texas at Austin, ), 17 Author: Mark Bassin.   Vodka was already causing significant social problems by the seventeenth century, but the government, which enjoyed a virtual monopoly on its commerce, was loath to curtail production and lose.

Siberia in the seventeenth century by George V. Lantzeff Download PDF EPUB FB2

The conquest of Siberia presents a picture somewhat analogous to the conquest of the American continent, and it is remarkable for the speed of the Russian advance. At the end of the sixteenth century the fall of the Siberian khanate (a small Tatar.

In The Merchants of Siberia, Erika Monahan reconsiders commerce in early modern Russia by reconstructing the trading world of Siberia and the careers of merchants who traded follows the histories of three merchant families from various social ranks who conducted trade in Siberia for well over a century.

These include the Filat'evs, who were among Russia’s most 5/5(2). However, the book is divided up nicely in about 20 or so pages per chapter and they read Siberia in the seventeenth century book a lecture would sound if you were sitting in on the authors class and that made it enjoyable to read.

The book ends pointing out several generalizations about the 17th century history of Russia that are still revelant among historians today. Russian exiles began to go to Siberia very soon after its discovery and conquest-as early probably as the first half of the seventeenth century. The earliest mention of exile in Russian legislation is in a law of the Tsar Alexei Mikhailovich in Additional Physical Format: Online version: Lantzeff, George V.

(George Vjatcheslau), b. Siberia in the seventeenth century. Berkeley, University of California. ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Reprint of the ed., which was Based on the author's thesis, University of California,   An informative history of Siberia, its settlement and development since seventeenth century, written by a historian Janet Hartley.

An interesting description of various national groups making up the population of Siberia/5. Books shelved as siberia: Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys, Travels in Siberia by Ian Frazier, The Reindeer People: Living with Animals and Spirits.

Siberia in the Seventeenth Century: A Study of the Colonial Administration By George V. Lantzeff University of California Press, Read preview Overview The Newly Independent States of Eurasia: Handbook of Former Soviet Republics By Sandra L. Batalden; Stephen K. Batalden Oryx Press, (2nd edition).

In The Merchants of Siberia, Erika Monahan reconsiders commerce in early modern Russia by reconstructing the trading world of Siberia and the careers of merchants who traded there. She follows the histories of three merchant families from various social ranks who conducted trade in.

Siberia (/ s aɪ ˈ b ɪər i ə /; Russian: Сибирь, tr. Sibír', IPA: [sʲɪˈbʲirʲ] ()) is an extensive geographical region spanning much of Eurasia and North a has been part of modern Russia since the 17th century. The territory of Siberia extends eastwards from the Ural Mountains to the watershed between the Pacific and Arctic drainage basins.

Siberia has had an interesting history, quite distinct from that of Russia. Absolutely vast, containing many non-Russian nationalities, and increasingly important at present because of its huge energy reserves, Siberia was at one time part of the Mongol Empire, was settled relatively late by the Russians, and was for a long period a wild frontier zone, similar to the 5/5(1).

After Russia acquired Siberia, tsars of the seventeenth century sometimes were told by Westerners that their dominion exceeded the size of the surface of the full moon. What was a yasak in seventeenth-century Siberia. Tribute paid by conquered people. Which of the following was a distinctive feature of the Qing dynasty.

They were of nomadic origin, hailing from Manchuria. Which of the following statements best reflects European motivations for overseas expansion at the end of the fifteenth century. The history of Russian expansion across Siberia is the story of an empire learning to function and evolving as it did so.

By the early nineteenth century the Russian Empire under Tsar Nicholas I advertised an official self-identity of “Orthodoxy, Autocracy, Nationality,” but in the seventeenth century such a formulation was still far off.

“Siberia is a wardrobe problem,” remarks Olga Rimaeva, a round-faced babushka descended from seventeenth-century Polish exiles: too hot in summer, too cold in winter.

I meet her in the eastern Author: Sophy Roberts. A good part of A History of the Peoples of Siberia is ethnohistory, combining ethnographic description of customs, clothing, ways of life, and so forth with explanations of the broader political and economic changes, education and language policies, and suchlike that were changing those.

This often involves surveys of different ethnic groups: "In seventeenth-century Yukagir society. ever, in eastern Siberia the relative proportion of the tenth portion tax was greater than that for Siberia in general.

At the height of sable harvest-ing, in the middle of the seventeenth century, the state received 50%% of its entire sable tax from Russian trappers in eastern Siberia (Pavlov ).

The collection of iasak furs cost the. The population grew from someindigenous people and settlers at the end of the seventeenth century to over a million by and over 2 million by The migration to Siberia in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, when about 3 million peasants crossed the Urals, paralleled the mass migration from Europe to the United.

Siberia invaded: the seventeenth century; 3. Central and north-east Siberia in the seventeenth century; 4. The Mongolian and Chinese frontier in the seventeenth century; 5.

Russia's north Asian colony; 6. The eighteenth century; 7. Expansion in the north Pacific; 8. Siberia in the Russian empire: the nineteenth century; 9. Colonial settlers in Brand: Cambridge University Press. Siberia, Siberia (Russian: Сибирь, Сибирь) is a non-fiction book by the Russian writer Valentin was originally published in Russian in by Molodaya Gvardiya (Young Guard).

The second and third editions appeared in and ; an Author: Valentin Rasputin. Seventeenth-century Russia appears in an unusual perspective in this book: as a vibrant proto-industrial economy increasingly integrated into the European economy.

The “Windows on the World” metaphor organizes the heterogeneous information collected by the author in an efficient and reader-friendly manner.

Siberia is the region making up nearly all of Northern Asia. It is made up of the central and eastern portions of Russia and it encompasses the area from the Ural Mountains east to the Pacific also extends from the Arctic Ocean south to northern Kazakhstan and the borders of Mongolia and total Siberia covers million square miles ( million sq km) or Author: Amanda Briney.

In The Merchants of Siberia, Erika Monahan reconsiders commerce in early modern Russia by reconstructing the trading world of Siberia and the careers of merchants who traded follows the histories of three merchant families from various social ranks who conducted trade in Siberia for well over a century.

These include the Filat'evs, who were among Russia's most Cited by:   Russia in the seventeenth century had a particularly unusual form of official medicine: untilall medical practitioners employed at court or in the army were foreigners from Western Europe. 1 Even after that date, Russians made up only a small proportion of medical practitioners until the late eighteenth century.

2 Similarly, the majority of medical Cited by: 1. This, coupled with an interest in borderlands and frontiers, led me to write a dissertation that examines merchants and their practices in Siberia during the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

That project became my first book, The Merchants of Siberia: Trade in Early Modern Eurasia (Cornell University Press, ). In The Merchants of Siberia, Erika Monahan reconsiders commerce in early modern Russia by reconstructing the trading world of Siberia and the careers of merchants who traded there.

She follows the histories of three merchant families from various social ranks who conducted trade in Siberia for well over a century. Siberia: A History of the People Janet M. Hartley Larger in area than the United States and Europe combined, Siberia is a land of extremes, not merely in terms of climate and expanse, but in the many kinds of lives its population has led over the course of four centuries.

This is the first ethnohistory of Siberia to appear in English, and presents to an anglophone audience a vast corpus of previously inaccessible ethnographic and linguistic material. It covers from the early history of Siberia after the Russian conquest to collectivization and conscription during World War II and to the s movement ror native rights.5/5(1).

This is the first ethnohistory of Siberia to appear in English, tracing the history of the native peoples from the Russian conquest onwards. James Forsyth compares the Siberian experience with that of the Indians and Eskimos in North America and the book as a whole will provide readers with a vast corpus of ethnographic information previously inaccessible to 4/5(28).

In the seventeenth century about how many indigenous hunting, gathering, and herding people lived in Siberia? Less thanWhat great city, conquered inbecame the capital of the Ottoman Empire?This chapter examines the Russian empire’s expansion east and south into Siberia and the steppe in the eighteenth century.

Regarding the conquest of Siberia, it explores the role of Cossacks, the violence of the conquest and continued treatment of native peoples, and the in-migration of East Slavs. It surveys Russian in-migration and increasing control over the native Author: Nancy Shields Kollmann.The seventeenth century was a momentous epoch.

While western European countries were busy expanding westward and eastward, Russia, quietly crossed the Ural Mountains, absorbed Siberia and reached as far as Alaska. Russia did not expand toward the East with­ out opposition from the western European countries.